Donations – Rolls Royce Foundation http://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/ Sat, 21 May 2022 08:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/royce-150x150.png Donations – Rolls Royce Foundation http://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/ 32 32 Hillsdale did not compensate for lost taxes, but plans donations | News https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/hillsdale-did-not-compensate-for-lost-taxes-but-plans-donations-news/ Sat, 21 May 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/hillsdale-did-not-compensate-for-lost-taxes-but-plans-donations-news/ SOMERS — Hillsdale College officials said more than three years ago that the nonprofit college, which opened its satellite Blake Center for Faith and Freedom on Hall Hill Road in 2020, has pledged to compensate the city for lost tax revenue, but Somers has yet to receive funds or a firm commitment of when that […]]]>

SOMERS — Hillsdale College officials said more than three years ago that the nonprofit college, which opened its satellite Blake Center for Faith and Freedom on Hall Hill Road in 2020, has pledged to compensate the city for lost tax revenue, but Somers has yet to receive funds or a firm commitment of when that might happen.

But first coach Timothy RE Keeney said the college intended to contribute money to some community projects, including a paddling pool and the purchase of police body cameras.

The college does not yet have access to a $25 million trust that will help pay for expenses, he added.

The 100-acre Blake Center property was given to Hillsdale, along with $25 million, in 2019 by the late S. Prestley Blake and his wife, Helen, who wanted to establish a nonprofit educational and business center affiliated with a college on their behalf.

The center includes the Blakes’ former home at 732 Hall Hill Road, a replica of Thomas Jefferson’s 18th-century Monticello mansion that the Blakes built in 2014, and their daughter’s home, also on Hall Hill Road.

Because Hillsdale is a non-profit college, it is exempt from paying taxes to Somers.

The Blake Center began its programming at the mansion this spring with a guest seminar April 29-30.

Tax assessor Walter Topliff Jr. said this week that the city has not received any donations from Hillsdale College, adding that it is an “evolving situation.”

At present, he said, the loss of tax revenue from the property the Blakes donated to Hillsdale is about $80,000 because Helen Blake still owns her home at 700 Hall Hill Road. , for which she pays $21,000 in taxes. S. Prestley Blake passed away on February 12, 2021.

When Helen Blake hands over ownership of the home to Hillsdale, the lost tax revenue would be around $100,000, Topliff said.

Keeney said this week that Hillsdale College wants to be a good neighbor and he has no doubt the school and the Blake family will honor their promises to Somers.

It may take a while, he said, because the Blakes have established a $25 million revocable trust to support the Hillsdale real estate in Somers. However, Keeney said, that trust only becomes available upon the death of the late S. Prestley Blake and Helen Blake, who is still alive.

It costs Hillsdale about $1 million a year to maintain its properties in Somers, and Helen Blake has made substantial donations to the college to help with that upkeep, Keeney said.

It’s not up to him, as the first coach, to insist that Hillsdale or the Blake family donate to the city, Keeney said. It would be insulting to do so with a school and family that have already been generous enough, he said.

The Blake Center plans to make a donation to support the Macie’s Place wading pool, Keeney said. Longtime Somers residents Wendy and Bill McCloskey lost their daughter, Macie Grace, in December 2007 to Trisomy13 when she was just six days old. In his honor and to recognize the town’s outpouring of support for their family, they worked to install a wading pool on Field Park Road for the children’s enjoyment.

Additionally, Keeney said, the Blake Center plans to make a donation to support the purchase of police cameras now required by law.

“Hillsdale College has a tradition of working closely with sidewalk and school projects in Hillsdale, Michigan,” he said. “That’s the relationship college officials want to have with Somers.”

Once the trust fund is available for Hillsdale, Keeney said, there will be less financial pressure for maintenance and more donations to the city could be received.

For the past few years, Hillsdale College officials have said in town hall meetings that either the school or the Blake family will find a way to repay the city.

At a March 2019 briefing held at Joanna’s restaurant on Main Street, Hillsdale Chief of Staff Michael Harner estimated that the city’s lost revenue would be around $100,000 per year.

“That’s a concern we’re trying to address,” he said, adding that the college has committed to replacing those funds, but college officials have not determined exactly how they will do so. .

Former coach Timothy Potrikus, who attended the event, said at the time that it was concerning that Harner had no concrete plan to replace tax revenue.

“He answered the question without answering it,” Potrikus said. “There were no details.” Potrikus also said the state has a payment-in-lieu program that the college could use as a model. He said the city would gladly accept the money.

According to the minutes of the January 7, 2019 Economic Development Commission meeting, events to be held on the property would attract an estimated attendance of 50-75 people and there would be 15-20 events per year.

The minutes also state that while the impact of the Blakes’ plan on the city would be the loss of tax revenue, it would also create jobs for the community and result in maintenance of the property. The minutes also state that possible returns to the city would be “jail programs” and pre-kindergarten reading programs.

In a public hearing before the Zoning Commission on January 7, 2020, attorney Ryan Walsh, a Hillsdale alumnus who also represented the college, addressed issues previously raised by residents, including the loss of tax revenue due to the creation of the tax-exempt religious. center. He said the Blakes intended to fill the tax gap by donating to the city.

Hillsdale officials did not respond to requests for comment.

For more Somers and Enfield coverage, follow Susan Danseyar on Twitter: @susandanseyar, Facebook: Susan Danseyar, journalist.

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Track Academy now accepts donations with ADA Pay! | by COTI | May 2022 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/track-academy-now-accepts-donations-with-ada-pay-by-coti-may-2022/ Thu, 19 May 2022 16:01:48 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/track-academy-now-accepts-donations-with-ada-pay-by-coti-may-2022/ We are happy to announce that Track Academy has integrated ADA Pay into their website which will allow them to accept donations in $ADA. We remind you that the fees generated by ADA Pay transactions will be converted into $COTI and distributed to the Treasury as user rewards. Track Academy is a charity that helps […]]]>

We are happy to announce that Track Academy has integrated ADA Pay into their website which will allow them to accept donations in $ADA. We remind you that the fees generated by ADA Pay transactions will be converted into $COTI and distributed to the Treasury as user rewards.

Track Academy is a charity that helps disadvantaged young people in London by helping them realize their true potential and develop as positive members of their community. By accepting donations in ADA Pay, Track Academy will be able to continue and encourage young people to make positive changes in their lives despite difficult circumstances.

Connie Henry said: “Track Academy would like to thank COTI for the incredible support they have given us in setting up and integrating their platform to allow us to receive ADA Pay donations. The team has been patient and incredible attention to detail, and was never troubled by our novice approach to accepting this payment method. It’s not always easy to get into the world of cryptocurrency, but the team COTI has been with us every step of the way.

Connie Henry, founder of Track Academy

We are thrilled to be able to provide the building blocks needed to power such an important and socially responsible use case for the Cardano ecosystem, and we look forward to welcoming more organizations and merchants to the COTI ecosystem.

Stay COTI!

About the Track Academy

The Track Academy family includes former international athletes and coaches, mentors, teachers, business professionals and a number of highly motivated and passionate volunteers. We are also mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, relatives and friends who help make the community the best it can be. What makes us an integral part of the Track Academy family is a shared common belief. And it is that sport and education go hand in hand and, when combined, change lives. Sport and education enable individuals to achieve exceptional and, more importantly, lasting results. We know this because, for some of us, this has also been our history.

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Kidney donations from deceased donors with COVID-19 are considered safe https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/kidney-donations-from-deceased-donors-with-covid-19-are-considered-safe/ Tue, 17 May 2022 12:40:49 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/kidney-donations-from-deceased-donors-with-covid-19-are-considered-safe/ Source/Disclosures Published by: Disclosures: Wee reports that he is on the Veloxis speakers bureau. ADD A SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS Receive an email when new articles are published on Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . ” data-action=”subscribe”> Subscribe We […]]]>


Source/Disclosures


Disclosures: Wee reports that he is on the Veloxis speakers bureau.


We have not been able to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

According to data published in the Journal of Urology.

In a retrospective review, the Cleveland Clinic transplant team examined data from 55 patients who received kidney donation from 34 deceased donors with COVID-19 between February 2021 and October 2021. All donors were tested positive for COVID-19 within a median of 4 days after organ donation.


Quote from Alvin Wee, MD, MBA

Alvin Wee, MD, MBA, the program director for renal programs at the Cleveland Clinic.

Analyzes and follow-ups revealed that no kidney transplant recipients had contracted COVID-19 as a result of the transplant. The team concluded in this initial retrospective review that a kidney donation from a COVID-19 positive deceased donor is safe.

Healio interviewed the author of the study Alvin Wee, MD, MBA, the program director for renal programs at the Cleveland Clinic, to discuss the study results in more detail.

Helio: What prompted you and your team to conduct this research?

Pee: Despite the record number of transplants in 2021 here in the United States, there are still 90,000 people on the transplant list who need a kidney. As COVID-19 spreads, organ donations from this group of donors have been affected, as almost all organ procurement organizations here in the United States would move away from these cases. At Cleveland Clinic, we push the boundaries with one goal in mind: to help and provide the best care for our patients. As new patients were added to the waiting list and [COVID-19-positive deceased donor organs were being turned] far, the team has been keen to explore the use of kidneys with these types of donors. As we began to do so conservatively and modified our protocols as we gained more knowledge, we were inspired by the families of deceased donors who were grateful to be able to use the organs of their loved ones for help others. The families are very grateful that we were able to make sense of these senseless COVID-19 deaths. Overall, we sought to answer the question: Is accepting a kidney from a COVID-19 positive donor safe?

Healio: Can you describe the study?

Pee: We performed a retrospective review of 55 patients and 34 COVID-19 positive deceased donors. In this series, about two-thirds of the donors died from what was unrelated to COVID but tested positive for COVID-19, while the remaining donors died from COVID-19. All patients had good renal function. There was no difference in our management of postoperative immunosuppression. COVID-19 PCR tests were performed 7-10 days after transplantation.

Healio: What are the clinical results of this study?

None of the recipients contracted COVID-19 after receiving a kidney transplant from a donor who died positive for COVID-19. All functions of the kidney graft are excellent. We have a patient who died of his comorbidities. He never tested positive during the entire post-transplant follow-up.

Healio: Can other organs be transplanted, or just kidneys?

Pee: We also used livers from deceased COVID-19 donors. There are a few ratios of cores used.

Healio: If a recipient is infected with COVID after the transplant, will the infection be more severe than if the recipient received an organ from a deceased donor without COVID?

Pee: This will require further research. With this study, we focused on answering the question of whether or not the transplant would be as safe as a transplant from a healthy deceased donor.

Healio: Does this have an impact on the recipient’s vaccination process?

Pee: No. We encourage all immunocompromised patients to continue receiving the COVID-19 vaccines for which they are eligible. At the Cleveland Clinic, patients on the waitlist must be vaccinated. Receiving a kidney donation from a deceased COVID-19 positive donor does not change the vaccine recommendations established by the CDC.

Healio: What are the next steps in this research?

Pee: We conducted a follow-up study that included over 100 kidney transplant recipients who got their organ from a COVID-positive donor and compared them to recipients who did not. It was recently submitted for publication. One thing I can share is that the results are great and promising.

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Donations Provide College Tours for Girls of Color – News, Sports, Weather, Traffic and the Best of Minnesota and the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-St. Paul. https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/donations-provide-college-tours-for-girls-of-color-news-sports-weather-traffic-and-the-best-of-minnesota-and-the-twin-cities-of-minneapolis-st-paul/ Sun, 15 May 2022 12:56:30 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/donations-provide-college-tours-for-girls-of-color-news-sports-weather-traffic-and-the-best-of-minnesota-and-the-twin-cities-of-minneapolis-st-paul/ Bright Spot: Donations allow girls of color to visit collegesBlack Girl Advocate is a foundation that raises funds to take black girls on college tours. Thanks to generous donations, the foundation realized its vision. 8 minutes ago 7:30 a.m. weather reportSunday will be breezy and pleasant, with temperatures reaching the 70s across much of the […]]]>

Bright Spot: Donations allow girls of color to visit collegesBlack Girl Advocate is a foundation that raises funds to take black girls on college tours. Thanks to generous donations, the foundation realized its vision.

7:30 a.m. weather reportSunday will be breezy and pleasant, with temperatures reaching the 70s across much of the state.

Teenage girls present applications to senior executivesEight teenage girls from Minnesota met with some of the most powerful business leaders in the country.

How to get a good night’s sleepTurns out, there are some things you can do at night that will help you get a good, long night’s sleep.

Discover Hundreds of Cars at the Twin Cities Auto ShowThe Twin Cities Auto Show gets underway Sunday at the State Fairgrounds.

St. Cloud State swimmer saves family from drowningA St. Cloud State swimmer named Marena Kouba is a Carnegie Medal winner.

Twin Cities Auto Show Speeds Up at State FairgroundsIf you’re thinking of buying a new vehicle, you might want to visit the State Fairgrounds today.

4 things to know from May 15, 2022Here are four things you need to know for today.

WCCO Digital Update: Morning of May 15, 2022Esme Murphy has the latest titles.

6:30 a.m. weather reportSunday will be a windy day, with highs in the 70s for much of the state.

What the community is looking for Minneapolis’ next police chiefWCCO-TV’s Erin Hassanzadeh spoke with Sara Jones, who serves on the MPD’s chief search committee, about the qualities members want to see in the city’s next police chief.

10:00 p.m. Next weather reportMeteorologist Lisa Meadows reports when Minnesota could see the storms return.

Work Kitchen Hosting Chef-In-Training ProgramA unique opportunity this summer to pay young people to gain practical experience in the restaurant industry.

Minnesota GOP endorses Dr. Scott Jensen for governorThe approval came after a long and contentious voting process at the Minnesota GOP Convention in Rochester.

6:00 p.m. Next weather reportMeteorologist Lisa Meadows indicates when storms are expected to return to Minnesota next week.

Woman from Wisconsin trying to kayak on the Mississippi RiverBobbi Rathert is on a mission to raise money for an African-American community center.

Opening of a bakery owned by a black woman in MinneapolisThe vegan restaurant employs people who are returning to the workforce after serving a prison sentence.

Minnesota GOP taps Dr. Scott Jensen for gubernatorial raceMinnesota Republicans endorse Dr. Scott Jensen for governor after a long and contentious process. After nine ballots, he obtained 65% of the votes.

Thousands Gather for Abortion Rights Rally in St. PaulIn light of the leaked Supreme Court majority opinion bill posed to overturn federal protections for abortion access, thousands took to the streets of St. Paul on Saturday to make their voices heard. .

Minnesotans celebrate open fishingAnglers were out in force on Lake Minnetonka on Saturday, taking advantage of the mild weather and the opening of the fishery.

5 p.m. Next weather reportMeteorologist Lisa Meadows reports on the rest of the weekend forecast.

Anglers Celebrate Minnesota Fishing OpenAnglers flocked to Minnesota lakes on Saturday at the start of the state’s fishing opening.

Minnesota Republicans will pick Walz ChallengerDelegates are due to choose a gubernatorial candidate on Saturday at the Minnesota GOP convention in Rochester.

Officials insist on safety at 2022 fishing openAbout 500,000 anglers are expected to reach their favorite lake this weekend.

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Daffy Repackages Donor-Driven Fund – Tearsheet https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/daffy-repackages-donor-driven-fund-tearsheet/ Fri, 13 May 2022 11:52:25 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/daffy-repackages-donor-driven-fund-tearsheet/ Donor-advised funds have had a bad reputation in the past. That’s because the way these funds are put together, in all honesty, is a bit sketchy. Not quite a private foundation and not quite a public charity, the DAFs contain some pretty solid shortcomings thanks to their not-so-solid setup. In short, wealthy individuals were able […]]]>

Donor-advised funds have had a bad reputation in the past. That’s because the way these funds are put together, in all honesty, is a bit sketchy. Not quite a private foundation and not quite a public charity, the DAFs contain some pretty solid shortcomings thanks to their not-so-solid setup.

In short, wealthy individuals were able to store their money in these funds, under the guise that it was for a future charitable donation. But the tax deduction occurs before the donations are actually made. Meanwhile, there is no timeline for giving, which means the money can just sit back, relax, and grow.

It is therefore not surprising that these funds have become more popular in recent years. To give you an idea, here are some stats from a CNBC article in August 2021:

  • Over the past decade, total assets of donor-advised funds have reached $140 billion, more than quadrupling.
  • One in eight dollars donated to charity in America goes to a CFO.

But times are changing: investing is no longer a game for the wealthy, and donor-advised funds may not be either.

Daffy wants to make donor directed funds accessible to everyone.

Co-founded in 2020 by fintech veteran and former Wealthfront CEO Adam Nash, Daffy’s app essentially offers a way to automate the donation process.

“What we’ve found is that most people want to give, and they have an idea of ​​how much they should give. They just don’t get into it because life is busy,” Nash said. “We have work, we have our social life, we have family, etc. And so a lot of people can’t find the time to give the money they want to give. Daffy sort of solves that.

Source: Daffy

Daffy works like this: once the user has signed up and entered their bank details, they are asked to set their donation goal, both in terms of amount and frequency. The app then automates donations.

There is also the investment part of the application. Daffy offers nine portfolios divided into three different categories, including standard, ESG and crypto. Each portfolio has a different degree of risk and volatility, which are described as conservative, moderate or aggressive.

Wallets increase money over time so the user ends up giving more. Tax-deductible donation receipts are saved in the app.

Daffy says it currently offers 1.5 million US nonprofits that consumers can choose from to direct their giving.

As for how users can donate, they can link their bank account, use Apple Pay, credit cards, debit cards, stocks, and about 120 different crypto coins.

“Our business model is quite radical and disruptive for the industry. And so we had to quickly, in the first few weeks, implement the ability to transfer us a donor-advised fund, which we’re supporting now. The same thing happened with crypto,” Nash said.

Source: Daffy

The company makes money by charging monthly or annual fees. If the user chooses to donate with crypto, the monthly fee is around $20. Otherwise it’s $3.

One neat thing about Daffy’s app is that it acts as a kind of “donation plug adapter”. An example Nash gives is of an early Daffy user who wanted to donate to his synagogue using crypto. Because the synagogue didn’t have the tools to accept a crypto donation, Daffy came in as a middleman.

“It’s not practical for every synagogue, nonprofit, community center, zoo, or any other organization to know what the latest technology is and how to support a new coin from Coinbase,” Nash said. Fintechs like Daffy can provide a solution to this.

Daffy’s emergence shows where the financial ecosystem is at with fintech, Nash said. New tools appear regularly in all aspects of the industry, with movements in stocks, crypto and silver as a few examples.

And if the first step in fintech innovation was laying out the fresh ingredients, Daffy talks about the second step, which is testing new recipes.

“I think one of the reasons we were able to launch Daffy as quickly as we have been is how robust the fintech ecosystem has become over the last decade, frankly,” Nash said.

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Donations needed to support thrift stores in St. Vincent https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/donations-needed-to-support-thrift-stores-in-st-vincent/ Wed, 11 May 2022 04:04:00 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/donations-needed-to-support-thrift-stores-in-st-vincent/ RENO, Nevada (KOLO) – Catholic Charities in Northern Nevada are asking for donations from your shed, closet or garage. You can bring gently used items like men’s, women’s and children’s clothing, holiday decorations, gardening tools, books, toys and household items. Proceeds from sales help fund the nonprofit’s pantries, immigration aid, and St Vincent’s Dining Hall […]]]>

RENO, Nevada (KOLO) – Catholic Charities in Northern Nevada are asking for donations from your shed, closet or garage. You can bring gently used items like men’s, women’s and children’s clothing, holiday decorations, gardening tools, books, toys and household items.

Proceeds from sales help fund the nonprofit’s pantries, immigration aid, and St Vincent’s Dining Hall alone serves more than a thousand hot meals each day.

100% of the profits stay here in our community, as CEO Marie Baxter details: “While you’re cleaning out those closets, those garages that you’re tackling, you might have a yard sale and whatever isn’t selling. ..please if you donate to Catholic Charities through St. Vincent Thrift Stores it absolutely helps your neighbors in need through a variety of different programs that we have here.

We are told that no mattresses or televisions will be accepted.

St. Vincent’s Super Thrift is located at 190 E. Glendale Avenue in Sparks. Donations can be made Monday through Sunday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Super Thrift is open Monday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

In addition to the two thrift stores, Catholic Charities operates a number of conveniently located drop-off points. For a full list, go to https://ccsnn.org/pages/donation-drop-off-locations.

For more information on Catholic charities, visit https://ccsnn.org/.

Copyright 2022 KOLO. All rights reserved.

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Baldwin Park Kids Club collects donations for refugees in Ukraine | Baldwin Park Living https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/baldwin-park-kids-club-collects-donations-for-refugees-in-ukraine-baldwin-park-living/ Mon, 09 May 2022 03:12:00 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/baldwin-park-kids-club-collects-donations-for-refugees-in-ukraine-baldwin-park-living/ The Baldwin Park Kids Club is doing its part to help refugees in Ukraine. Although the Russian-Ukrainian war has been escalating for years, the conflict erupted in February with a Russian invasion of Ukraine, causing hundreds of civilian deaths and the destruction of infrastructure. Millions of refugees have fled their homes in search of safety, […]]]>

The Baldwin Park Kids Club is doing its part to help refugees in Ukraine.

Although the Russian-Ukrainian war has been escalating for years, the conflict erupted in February with a Russian invasion of Ukraine, causing hundreds of civilian deaths and the destruction of infrastructure.

Millions of refugees have fled their homes in search of safety, protection and assistance.

The Baldwin Park Kids Club combined an Easter holiday celebration with a giving effort for Ukrainian families and children during an afternoon egg hunt on Friday, April 15.

Bree Holbrook, the club’s community services and outreach coordinator, remembers when she first learned of the turmoil.

“I was heartbroken and couldn’t imagine having to go through something like this,” she said.

The club asked attendees to bring 12 unsweetened deviled eggs and items to donate to the refugees, including canned meat, oil, salt, powdered milk, baby supplies, wipes, diapers, tampons and old baby carriers.

Donations were dropped off at the Lake Baldwin Church office in downtown Baldwin Park.

“It’s really important to give back to our community so our kids learn that life isn’t just about them,” says Holbrook. “Doing for others and wanting to make this world a better place is what this world needs. If we can teach this to our children at an early age it will help them because adults have a heart for those who need it.

The club has worked together with Dan and Rebecca Gregoire, who have lived and worked in Slovakia for 15 years. The couple currently live in Spisska Nova Ves, about two hours from the Ukrainian border, where they opened their home to Ukrainian refugees and traveled almost daily to the border to deliver supplies and provide safe transportation for women and children. children fleeing the country.

Holbrook says she hopes the event raised awareness of the crisis in Ukraine and gave local children a chance to have fun Easter egg hunts.

Alena Baker, lead organizer and founding member of the club, says it holds a special place in her heart.

“I love that the Baldwin Park Kids Club brings the children of our community together for both friendship and to instill the value of service to others,” says Baker.

BALDWIN PARK KIDS CLUB

To find out more about the Baldwin Park Kids Club, email [email protected].


The Observer has invested in new technologies, so you can enjoy a more personalized online experience. By creating a user profile on OrangeObserver.comyou can manage settings, customize content, enter contests and more, while still enjoying all the local news that matters to you — .

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Donations Arrive for TWA Flight 800 Memorial Renovation | Community https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/donations-arrive-for-twa-flight-800-memorial-renovation-community/ Sat, 07 May 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/donations-arrive-for-twa-flight-800-memorial-renovation-community/ Montoursville, Pennsylvania – The TWA Flight 800 memorial in Montoursville is in need of $200,000 in major repairs and maintenance, officials say. Robert Weaver (left), whose daughter was one of the accident victims, recently received a donation for the Eagle Grange renovations in the amount of $320. photo provided The memorial is dedicated to the […]]]>

Montoursville, Pennsylvania – The TWA Flight 800 memorial in Montoursville is in need of $200,000 in major repairs and maintenance, officials say.






Robert Weaver (left), whose daughter was one of the accident victims, recently received a donation for the Eagle Grange renovations in the amount of $320.




The memorial is dedicated to the 16 Montoursville High School students and five attendants who lost their lives in the 1996 TWA plane crash that killed all 230 passengers on board. The students and chaperones were on a trip from the French Club to Paris when the plane exploded shortly after leaving JFK airport in New York.

The initial renovation of the memorial will cost $121,900, with the remaining $78,100 being used for future maintenance.

Donations are being accepted through the Montoursville Area School District Memorial Fund, where they have received $23,700 so far.

“It’s something that needs to be done,” Montoursville Mayor Steve Bagwell said. “It’s not just something you wish for or something you look at and say, ‘You know, damn it, we could make this a little prettier. “”







Montoursville Memorial Gardens Renovation Plan.jpg

Memorial renovation plans




Montoursville Memorial Gardens was dedicated in 1999 and is currently in need of extensive walkway repairs totaling $79,000.

Bagwell said the current walkway is very close to the 21 maple trees, which each represent a victim of the accident. The root system gradually began to tear the stone bricks.

The plan is to remove the bricks that currently make up the walkway, replacing them with concrete pavers. The walkway will also be moved closer to the center by six meters to avoid future problems with roots.







Steve Bagwell, photo showing damage to Montoursville Memorial Garden.jpg

Roots can be seen growing between the bricks, which have been moved around creating an uneven surface.




The hemlocks around the property line will also be replaced with emerald green arborvitae that will not need pruning. It should cost $14,900.

Plans also call for the removal of mulch around the maple trees that represent each victim. This will be replaced with a pachysandra ground cover for $28,000. This will eliminate the need for annual mulch replacement.

“The project isn’t just going to keep intact what’s been done before,” Bagwell said. “It’s going to mean that there’s a lot less maintenance to do in the future.”

Donations permitting, the plan is to begin renovations to the memorial this fall.

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Donations soar past $1.6 million just before 10 p.m. https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/donations-soar-past-1-6-million-just-before-10-p-m/ Wed, 04 May 2022 03:11:15 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/donations-soar-past-1-6-million-just-before-10-p-m/ Abilene Gives Surpasses $1.6 Million Donations for Abilene Gives have surged in the past few hours, crossing $1.6 million just before 10 p.m. Tuesday. More than 3,600 donors contributed to the benefit of all the associations participating in the campaign. At the top of the ranking at 10 p.m.: Buffalo Gap’s Camp Abilene: $85,715 from […]]]>

Abilene Gives Surpasses $1.6 Million

Donations for Abilene Gives have surged in the past few hours, crossing $1.6 million just before 10 p.m. Tuesday.

More than 3,600 donors contributed to the benefit of all the associations participating in the campaign.

At the top of the ranking at 10 p.m.:

  1. Buffalo Gap’s Camp Abilene: $85,715 from 144 donors
  2. West Texas Rehab: $69,335 from 40 donors
  3. Abilene Pregnancy Resources: $58,540 from 65 Donors
  4. Abilene Woman’s Club Foundation: $46,650 from 130 donors
  5. Gold Monarch Healing Center: $45,310 from 41 donors

Abilene Gives tops $1.5 million before 9 p.m.

Donations for Abilene Gives topped $1.5 million as of 8:37 p.m. Tuesday, with just over three hours remaining in fundraising all day.

More than 3,271 donors contributed to the benefit of all the associations participating in the campaign.

At the top of the ranking at 8:40 p.m.:

  1. Buffalo Gap’s Camp Abilene: $73,080 from 122 donors
  2. West Texas Rehab: $67,185 from 37 donors
  3. Abilene Pregnancy Resources: $54,285 from 53 Donors
  4. Abilene Woman’s Club Foundation: $44,140 from 126 donors
  5. Gold Monarch Healing Center: $43,335 from 37 donors
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New York schools and students restart much-needed blood drives stalled by COVID pandemic – New York Daily News https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/new-york-schools-and-students-restart-much-needed-blood-drives-stalled-by-covid-pandemic-new-york-daily-news/ Sun, 01 May 2022 22:35:00 +0000 https://www.rollsroycefoundation.com/new-york-schools-and-students-restart-much-needed-blood-drives-stalled-by-covid-pandemic-new-york-daily-news/ Before the pandemic, whenever blood donations dwindled, school blood drives served as a regular supply to the New York Blood Center, making up about a quarter of the center’s supply and helping to cultivate a lifelong habit of donating blood among participating teenagers. But that source dried up during the pandemic as schools closed and […]]]>

Before the pandemic, whenever blood donations dwindled, school blood drives served as a regular supply to the New York Blood Center, making up about a quarter of the center’s supply and helping to cultivate a lifelong habit of donating blood among participating teenagers.

But that source dried up during the pandemic as schools closed and transitioned to remote learning, and COVID-19 restrictions limited in-person gatherings at schools. The Blood Center has gone from hosting 61 city high school drives between January and March 2019, which generated more than 3,000 blood donations, to just three school drives for a total of 182 donations over the course of the same period last year, according to the organization.

The shortage of blood in the bank has had critical short-term consequences for hospitals and healthcare providers who rely on donations for a range of medical procedures, and the demand for blood is even higher today than in the past. beginning of the pandemic, according to Andrea Cefarelli, the executive director of the Blood Center.

The slowing of school campaigns could also have a long-term effect on the blood supply, with fewer teenagers being able to form the habit of donating blood while they are young, according to staff members of the Blood Center.

Now, as COVID-19 restrictions loosen at schools across the city, Blood Center teens, educators and staff are scrambling to bring school blood drives back to pre-pandemic levels — working diligently in behind the scenes to organize events, mobilizing students and teachers to participate, and trying to spread the word to still wary children and adults.

“We felt compelled to do this,” said Pat Fasano, director of the nursing program at Curtis High School in Staten Island, who, alongside her teenage students preparing to become nurses, held three blood drives. so far this school year.

“Nurses come in when no one else does,” she added. “We thought it would trigger a domino effect with other schools opening as well.”

Cefarelli said the number of school blood drives has started to rebound, but remains well below pre-pandemic levels, with 26 high schools in the city holding drives between January and March this year for a total. of 1,212 donations.

But students and staff said there are still formidable obstacles.

At the start of this school year — the first with full-time in-person learning in the city’s public schools since the pandemic began — many teachers and children were still wary of a COVID-19 risk, or simply concerned about more immediate risks. concerns, Cefarelli said.

Restrictive visitor rules at some schools have also made it difficult for the Blood Center to enter and host drives, which must take place indoors under federal Food and Drug Administration guidelines. Some of the staff who led readers before the pandemic left their schools between March 2020 and September 2021, Cefarelli added, forcing the Blood Center to rebuild relationships with new educators.

“Blood drives were just an extra extracurricular activity that they couldn’t commit to in the midst of their relationships with everyone,” Cefarelli said.

Just as the Blood Center was beginning to regain momentum with schools, the winter push of omicron hit, keeping kids home in droves and scuttling plans once again.

At Curtis High School, however, students in the nursing program were determined to get their blood drive started, despite the challenges. Marco Kua and Arlinda Lajci, 18, have taken it upon themselves to organise, fanning out across the school of 2,400 pupils to encourage pupils – who must be 16 or older to participate – and staff to give blood.

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They posted flyers, made announcements over the PA system and answered questions from students – most of whom had never donated blood before.

“It was difficult trying to involve the students,” recalls Marco. “They fear getting sick.”

Arlinda added that some students had told her “they were afraid of the needles of all the vaccines”.

But the teens have persisted, launching three blood drives so far this school year, and they’ve seen attendance rise steadily from the first event in October to the most recent earlier this month.

The student organizers overcame some of the challenges that come with any blood drive: children refused because their blood didn’t meet the bank’s specifications and several donors passed out. But with the help of medical personnel on site, the events went smoothly, the teenagers said.

And despite all the obstacles the pandemic has thrown at them, the teens said the experience has only strengthened their beliefs about the importance of blood donation – and their commitment to working in health care.

“Seeing how nurses work and operate during the pandemic, they are always the first in line,” Marco said, “and I want to be part of that.”

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